Materials Management: Science Storage

One of the challenges of working in a non-traditional environment is storage.  Since I am a homeschool science teacher I lack many of the facilities that most teachers take for granted – such as a dedicated classroom and a supply closet.  Since I have to store most of my lab supplies in my apartment, I am constantly looking for creative solutions.  As a result, I’ve begun decorating with some of the more attractive supplies.  Corners of my home have taken on a distinctly cabinet of curiosities air.

This shelf has fossils, mineral samples, found bones, and graduated cylinders, all of which get used for classes.
This shelf has fossils, mineral samples, found bones, and graduated cylinders, all of which get used for classes.
Graduated cylinders, Erlenmeyer flasks, a beaker, a volumetric flask, a barometer, and a few non-science bottles sit on a windowsill until I need them.
Graduated cylinders, Erlenmeyer flasks, a beaker, a volumetric flask, a barometer, and a few non-science bottles sit on a windowsill until I need them.

Decorating with science supplies is only a partial solution – I still have an excessive-feeling number of carefully labeled crates filled with everything from to anatomical models to zinc electrodes.  But, every little bit of multi-tasking with materials helps.

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